THE STRENGTH TO FIGHT.
THE CONFIDENCE TO WIN.

THE STRENGTH TO FIGHT.
THE CONFIDENCE TO WIN.

What do you know about accidental credit card fraud?

You read a recent news article about a white-collar criminal who committed credit card fraud. While reading more about the details of the wrongdoing, you realized that some of your credit card activity may border on accidental crimes.

To keep you on the right side of the law, see what GOBankingRates says about accidental credit card fraud. Not knowing the law may not serve as a solid defense for unintentionally breaking the law.

Debating charges you made

Think twice about debating charges on credit card statements that you do not recognize. Maybe you made a purchase while in a hurry or before bed while exhausted. Debating legal charges that you made on your card becomes easy when merchants and stores use different names on credit card statements and receipts. Before calling your credit card issuer about a mistake that does not exist, double-check the time and location of the charge, and research the merchant name on your statement or receipt to see if it looks familiar.

Manipulating the truth on credit card applications

The next time you complete a credit card application, aim for accuracy when writing your current income. Guessing may not seem harmful, but exaggerating the facts on credit card applications may amount to fraud in the eyes of the law. If a Florida court finds you guilty of committing fraud, you may face jail time, fines and probation.

Signing a friend’s credit card receipt

You may think nothing of signing a credit card receipt for a friend who stepped away to make a call after treating you to dinner. The legal trouble comes if your friend disputes a charge with your handwriting on the receipt. Rather than your friend, you take the full brunt of the legal fallout.

Do not take unnecessary or unknown risks with credit cards. Minor infractions may result in major legal ramifications.

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